Home > Eat > Recipe > Recipe: sour rhubarb fizz

Recipe: sour rhubarb fizz

dairy free
drinks
summer
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars
(No Ratings Yet)
Loading...

If you’re partial to a fermented beverage that packs plenty of tartness in its punch, sour rhubarb fizz is your new go-to refreshment. This recipe comes to Khoollect from Louise Avery, of Lois & the Living Teas, a woman whose knowledge of this fermented tea beverage is extensive. Here’s what she told us about it:

‘Rhubarb is a classic English vegetable and one of my absolute favourite flavours with its natural tang enhancing the sour sweetness of the kombucha. It is also the first thing to come up in the spring and the first thing you start to see at farmers’ markets, so if it’s not in your garden it will be in your neighbours’. I use a light green tea base for this recipe as it allows the subtle rhubarb to come through, complemented by the sour apple to give it bite.

Rhubarb stalks contain complex B-vitamins such as folates, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), thiamin and pantothenic acid. Rhubarb also aids digestion, is rich in vitamin K (helping to prevent Alzheimer’s disease) and promotes bone health. It is full of antioxidants and is believed to reduce the risk of cardiovascular problems.’

Living Tea by Louise Avery (Ryland Peters & Small, £9.99). Photos by Clare Winfield. 

Sour rhubarb fizz

Curious about kombucha?

Master the basic recipe, here, and read our interview with Louise Avery.

Recipe and photo by

Recipe from: Living Tea by Louise Avery (Ryland Peters & Small, £9.99)
Photographer: Clare Winfield

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars
(No Ratings Yet)
Loading...

Preparation Time10 MINUTES

Cooking Time40 MINUTES

Resting Time2 days 0 MINUTES

Serves8-16

LevelMedium


ingredients

2 green apples (such as Granny Smith)
2 litres basic kombucha

Rhubarb syrup

500g red rhubarb or forced rhubarb
100 g granulated sugar, to taste
a cold-press juicer
4 x 500ml capacity glass bottles with airtight lids

Curious about kombucha?

Master the basic recipe, here, and read our interview with Louise Avery.

Recipe and photo by

Recipe from: Living Tea by Louise Avery (Ryland Peters & Small, £9.99)
Photographer: Clare Winfield

1

To make the rhubarb syrup, top and tail the rhubarb stalks, chop up finely and cover with 500ml water in a saucepan. Bring to the boil over medium heat. Reduce to a simmer leaving on low–medium heat for 20 minutes until the rhubarb has broken down and lost most of its pink colouring, gently removing any foam as it appears. Strain the liquid into a separate pan without squashing the rhubarb, and bring to the boil once again. Add the sugar to taste – you can add as little or as much as you like here; it is really personal preference on how sweet you would like your syrup. Once boiled, reduce the heat and leave to simmer for another 20 minutes, reducing the liquid to a thick, syrupy consistency.

Leave to cool completely, bottle and refrigerate.

2

Once cold, juice the apples in the cold-press juicer, and add roughly 50 ml of the rhubarb syrup and one-quarter of the apple juice to each bottle. Top up with unflavoured kombucha leaving a 1-cm air space at the top then seal tightly.

3

Leave the sealed bottles at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, for 1–2 days before testing for carbonation. Due to the sugar content in the syrup, it is advisable to check your rhubarb kombucha after 2 days to see how much fizz has built up. Refrigerate when the taste and fizz are to your liking. Serve cold.

SHOW MORE
SHOW LESS

Preparation Time10 MINUTES

Cooking Time40 MINUTES

Resting Time2 days 0 MINUTES

Serves8-16

LevelMedium


ingredients

2 green apples (such as Granny Smith)
2 litres basic kombucha

Rhubarb syrup

500g red rhubarb or forced rhubarb
100 g granulated sugar, to taste
a cold-press juicer
4 x 500ml capacity glass bottles with airtight lids

Curious about kombucha?

Master the basic recipe, here, and read our interview with Louise Avery.

Recipe and photo by

Recipe from: Living Tea by Louise Avery (Ryland Peters & Small, £9.99)
Photographer: Clare Winfield

1

To make the rhubarb syrup, top and tail the rhubarb stalks, chop up finely and cover with 500ml water in a saucepan. Bring to the boil over medium heat. Reduce to a simmer leaving on low–medium heat for 20 minutes until the rhubarb has broken down and lost most of its pink colouring, gently removing any foam as it appears. Strain the liquid into a separate pan without squashing the rhubarb, and bring to the boil once again. Add the sugar to taste – you can add as little or as much as you like here; it is really personal preference on how sweet you would like your syrup. Once boiled, reduce the heat and leave to simmer for another 20 minutes, reducing the liquid to a thick, syrupy consistency.

Leave to cool completely, bottle and refrigerate.

2

Once cold, juice the apples in the cold-press juicer, and add roughly 50 ml of the rhubarb syrup and one-quarter of the apple juice to each bottle. Top up with unflavoured kombucha leaving a 1-cm air space at the top then seal tightly.

3

Leave the sealed bottles at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, for 1–2 days before testing for carbonation. Due to the sugar content in the syrup, it is advisable to check your rhubarb kombucha after 2 days to see how much fizz has built up. Refrigerate when the taste and fizz are to your liking. Serve cold.

SHOW MORE
SHOW LESS

If you’re partial to a fermented beverage that packs plenty of tartness in its punch, sour rhubarb fizz is your new go-to refreshment. This recipe comes to Khoollect from Louise Avery, of Lois & the Living Teas, a woman whose knowledge of this fermented tea beverage is extensive. Here’s what she told us about it:

‘Rhubarb is a classic English vegetable and one of my absolute favourite flavours with its natural tang enhancing the sour sweetness of the kombucha. It is also the first thing to come up in the spring and the first thing you start to see at farmers’ markets, so if it’s not in your garden it will be in your neighbours’. I use a light green tea base for this recipe as it allows the subtle rhubarb to come through, complemented by the sour apple to give it bite.

Rhubarb stalks contain complex B-vitamins such as folates, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), thiamin and pantothenic acid. Rhubarb also aids digestion, is rich in vitamin K (helping to prevent Alzheimer’s disease) and promotes bone health. It is full of antioxidants and is believed to reduce the risk of cardiovascular problems.’

Living Tea by Louise Avery (Ryland Peters & Small, £9.99). Photos by Clare Winfield. 

Sour rhubarb fizz

1

To make the rhubarb syrup, top and tail the rhubarb stalks, chop up finely and cover with 500ml water in a saucepan. Bring to the boil over medium heat. Reduce to a simmer leaving on low–medium heat for 20 minutes until the rhubarb has broken down and lost most of its pink colouring, gently removing any foam as it appears. Strain the liquid into a separate pan without squashing the rhubarb, and bring to the boil once again. Add the sugar to taste – you can add as little or as much as you like here; it is really personal preference on how sweet you would like your syrup. Once boiled, reduce the heat and leave to simmer for another 20 minutes, reducing the liquid to a thick, syrupy consistency.

Leave to cool completely, bottle and refrigerate.

2

Once cold, juice the apples in the cold-press juicer, and add roughly 50 ml of the rhubarb syrup and one-quarter of the apple juice to each bottle. Top up with unflavoured kombucha leaving a 1-cm air space at the top then seal tightly.

3

Leave the sealed bottles at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, for 1–2 days before testing for carbonation. Due to the sugar content in the syrup, it is advisable to check your rhubarb kombucha after 2 days to see how much fizz has built up. Refrigerate when the taste and fizz are to your liking. Serve cold.

SHOW MORE
SHOW LESS
Profile Photo
WRITTEN BY:
Sonya Gellert

Sonya Gellert is a contributing writer and associate editor for Khoollect. She lives in Sydney....

READ MORE BY Sonya Gellert

You decide

Your dream holiday destination

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
Profile Photo
WRITTEN BY:
Sonya Gellert

Sonya Gellert is a contributing writer and associate editor for Khoollect. She lives in Sydney....

READ MORE BY Sonya Gellert

You decide

Your dream holiday destination

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
Profile Photo
WRITTEN BY:
Sonya Gellert

Sonya Gellert is a contributing writer and associate editor for Khoollect. She lives in Sydney....

READ MORE BY Sonya Gellert

You decide

Your dream holiday destination

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
comments
Leave A Comment

DON'T BE SHY WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URL

dairy free

no dairy

drinks

MORE RECIPES WITH drinks

summer

Summer

instagram

join us on instagram

instagram

join us on instagram
Skip to toolbar