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Recipe: Mont Blanc pavlova

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christmas
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Tips

The chestnut purée can be made a couple of days in advance and kept in an airtight container in the fridge.
If you don’t have time to make your own chestnut purée, you can find sweetened chestnut purée in supermarkets or specialty stores.
The pavlova is best assembled just prior to serving so that the pavlova does not become soggy from the cream and chestnut topping.

Find out more

Read more about Thanh in her interview with Khoollect. You can also check out her recent visit to the Zurich Christmas markets.

Recipe and photos by

Thanh Berthou of Eat, Little Bird blog.

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Preparation Time30 MINUTES

Cooking Time1 hour 15 minutes MINUTES

Resting Time2 hours MINUTES

Serves4-6

LevelMedium


ingredients

The Chocolate Pavlova

180 g (¾ cup) caster sugar

50 g (½ small bar) dark chocolate, roughly chopped

3 egg whites

1 ½ tbsp cocoa, sifted

1 ½ tsp cornflour

1 tsp white wine vinegar

The Chestnut Purée

375 g (1 ½ cups) cooked chestnuts (tinned or vacuum-packed)

200 ml (1 cup) full fat milk, plus extra

100 g (½ cup) caster sugar

1 tsp vanilla extract

2 tbsp rum or kirsch

The Cream Topping

250 ml (1 cup) double cream 

dark chocolate, for decorating

Equipment

Freestanding mixer or whisk

Piping bag, with ‘spaghetti’ or ‘grass’ nozzle OR a potato ricer

Tips

The chestnut purée can be made a couple of days in advance and kept in an airtight container in the fridge.
If you don’t have time to make your own chestnut purée, you can find sweetened chestnut purée in supermarkets or specialty stores.
The pavlova is best assembled just prior to serving so that the pavlova does not become soggy from the cream and chestnut topping.

Find out more

Read more about Thanh in her interview with Khoollect. You can also check out her recent visit to the Zurich Christmas markets.

Recipe and photos by

Thanh Berthou of Eat, Little Bird blog.

1

Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F) and line a baking tray with baking paper.

2

Using a freestanding mixer or electric beaters, whisk the egg whites until they have tripled in volume and stiff peaks form. Turn the speed down to low and slowly add the sugar, one tablespoon at a time, until it is well-incorporated.

3

Stir through the cornflour, vinegar and cocoa. Finally, stir through the chopped chocolate.

4

Spoon the pavlova mixture onto the baking tray, and spread into a circle shape. Use a palette knife to shape the sides of the pavlova and to flatten the top (so the topping will not slide off later).

5

Place the pavlova into the oven and immediately turn the temperature down to 150°C (300°F). Bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes. Turn off the oven (but don’t open the door) and leave the pavlova to cool and dry in the oven with the door closed.

6

To make the chestnut purée, place the chestnuts, milk, vanilla extract and rum into a medium saucepan. Simmer gently until the chestnuts have softened, and most of the milk has been absorbed.

7

Take the pan off the heat and mash the chestnuts with a potato masher until you have a smooth purée – you might need to add some more milk if the mixture is too thick. Return the pan to the heat, stir through the sugar, and cook for a few minutes until the mixture binds together. Set aside to cool.

8

Just before serving, whip the cream until soft peaks form.

9

To assemble, place a generous layer of the chestnut purée on top of the pavlova. To achieve the characteristic noodle strands, you will need to pipe the mixture using a spaghetti or grass nozzle (some countries sell a nozzle specifically for chestnut purée, or you can achieve a similar effect by pushing the chestnut purée through a potato ricer). If you don’t have a special nozzle or potato ricer, simply spread the chestnut purée over the pavlova using a palette knife.

10

To decorate, top the purée with a dollop of whipped cream and grate over some dark chocolate.

SHOW MORE
SHOW LESS
This delicious Mont Blanc pavlova recipe comes from Eat, Little Bird blogger Thanh Berthou. It’s a popular winter dessert in many European countries, comprising of sweetened chestnut Purée, softly whipped cream and crushed meringue. Thanh’s version brings a modern twist to this classic dish.
“This recipe is my way of bringing an Australian touch to Christmas with my family in Switzerland.”
Mont Blanc pavlova

Preparation Time30 MINUTES

Cooking Time1 hour 15 minutes MINUTES

Resting Time2 hours MINUTES

Serves4-6

LevelMedium


ingredients

The Chocolate Pavlova

180 g (¾ cup) caster sugar

50 g (½ small bar) dark chocolate, roughly chopped

3 egg whites

1 ½ tbsp cocoa, sifted

1 ½ tsp cornflour

1 tsp white wine vinegar

The Chestnut Purée

375 g (1 ½ cups) cooked chestnuts (tinned or vacuum-packed)

200 ml (1 cup) full fat milk, plus extra

100 g (½ cup) caster sugar

1 tsp vanilla extract

2 tbsp rum or kirsch

The Cream Topping

250 ml (1 cup) double cream 

dark chocolate, for decorating

Equipment

Freestanding mixer or whisk

Piping bag, with ‘spaghetti’ or ‘grass’ nozzle OR a potato ricer

Tips

The chestnut purée can be made a couple of days in advance and kept in an airtight container in the fridge.
If you don’t have time to make your own chestnut purée, you can find sweetened chestnut purée in supermarkets or specialty stores.
The pavlova is best assembled just prior to serving so that the pavlova does not become soggy from the cream and chestnut topping.

Find out more

Read more about Thanh in her interview with Khoollect. You can also check out her recent visit to the Zurich Christmas markets.

Recipe and photos by

Thanh Berthou of Eat, Little Bird blog.

1

Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F) and line a baking tray with baking paper.

2

Using a freestanding mixer or electric beaters, whisk the egg whites until they have tripled in volume and stiff peaks form. Turn the speed down to low and slowly add the sugar, one tablespoon at a time, until it is well-incorporated.

3

Stir through the cornflour, vinegar and cocoa. Finally, stir through the chopped chocolate.

4

Spoon the pavlova mixture onto the baking tray, and spread into a circle shape. Use a palette knife to shape the sides of the pavlova and to flatten the top (so the topping will not slide off later).

5

Place the pavlova into the oven and immediately turn the temperature down to 150°C (300°F). Bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes. Turn off the oven (but don’t open the door) and leave the pavlova to cool and dry in the oven with the door closed.

6

To make the chestnut purée, place the chestnuts, milk, vanilla extract and rum into a medium saucepan. Simmer gently until the chestnuts have softened, and most of the milk has been absorbed.

7

Take the pan off the heat and mash the chestnuts with a potato masher until you have a smooth purée – you might need to add some more milk if the mixture is too thick. Return the pan to the heat, stir through the sugar, and cook for a few minutes until the mixture binds together. Set aside to cool.

8

Just before serving, whip the cream until soft peaks form.

9

To assemble, place a generous layer of the chestnut purée on top of the pavlova. To achieve the characteristic noodle strands, you will need to pipe the mixture using a spaghetti or grass nozzle (some countries sell a nozzle specifically for chestnut purée, or you can achieve a similar effect by pushing the chestnut purée through a potato ricer). If you don’t have a special nozzle or potato ricer, simply spread the chestnut purée over the pavlova using a palette knife.

10

To decorate, top the purée with a dollop of whipped cream and grate over some dark chocolate.

SHOW MORE
SHOW LESS
This delicious Mont Blanc pavlova recipe comes from Eat, Little Bird blogger Thanh Berthou. It’s a popular winter dessert in many European countries, comprising of sweetened chestnut Purée, softly whipped cream and crushed meringue. Thanh’s version brings a modern twist to this classic dish.
“This recipe is my way of bringing an Australian touch to Christmas with my family in Switzerland.”
Mont Blanc pavlova
1

Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F) and line a baking tray with baking paper.

2

Using a freestanding mixer or electric beaters, whisk the egg whites until they have tripled in volume and stiff peaks form. Turn the speed down to low and slowly add the sugar, one tablespoon at a time, until it is well-incorporated.

3

Stir through the cornflour, vinegar and cocoa. Finally, stir through the chopped chocolate.

4

Spoon the pavlova mixture onto the baking tray, and spread into a circle shape. Use a palette knife to shape the sides of the pavlova and to flatten the top (so the topping will not slide off later).

5

Place the pavlova into the oven and immediately turn the temperature down to 150°C (300°F). Bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes. Turn off the oven (but don’t open the door) and leave the pavlova to cool and dry in the oven with the door closed.

6

To make the chestnut purée, place the chestnuts, milk, vanilla extract and rum into a medium saucepan. Simmer gently until the chestnuts have softened, and most of the milk has been absorbed.

7

Take the pan off the heat and mash the chestnuts with a potato masher until you have a smooth purée – you might need to add some more milk if the mixture is too thick. Return the pan to the heat, stir through the sugar, and cook for a few minutes until the mixture binds together. Set aside to cool.

8

Just before serving, whip the cream until soft peaks form.

9

To assemble, place a generous layer of the chestnut purée on top of the pavlova. To achieve the characteristic noodle strands, you will need to pipe the mixture using a spaghetti or grass nozzle (some countries sell a nozzle specifically for chestnut purée, or you can achieve a similar effect by pushing the chestnut purée through a potato ricer). If you don’t have a special nozzle or potato ricer, simply spread the chestnut purée over the pavlova using a palette knife.

10

To decorate, top the purée with a dollop of whipped cream and grate over some dark chocolate.

SHOW MORE
SHOW LESS
Profile photo of Thanh Berthou
WRITTEN BY:
Thanh Berthou

Thanh is Khoollect's recipe contributor. A jet-setting lawyer turned blogger, with an unwavering pas...

READ MORE BY Thanh Berthou

You decide

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Profile photo of Thanh Berthou
WRITTEN BY:
Thanh Berthou

Thanh is Khoollect's recipe contributor. A jet-setting lawyer turned blogger, with an unwavering pas...

READ MORE BY Thanh Berthou

You decide

Your dream holiday destination

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
Profile photo of Thanh Berthou
WRITTEN BY:
Thanh Berthou

Thanh is Khoollect's recipe contributor. A jet-setting lawyer turned blogger, with an unwavering pas...

READ MORE BY Thanh Berthou

You decide

Your dream holiday destination

View Results

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